Direct Care vs Insurance

For those of us that have high deductible insurance plans (my family and I have a bronze plan that combines a Health Savings Account with a HDHP) direct care just makes sense. Less cost up front means more money in your pocket. One question we get quite often is “Since I have good coverage, won’t direct care cost me more?” In the example below we show how direct care, even for those that have great coverage, can save money. Insurance* Direct Pay Moderate Visit $108.00 $90.00 Copay** $30.00 $0.00 CBC $12.83 $10.00 CMP $16.00 $12.00 Total $166.83 $112.00  80/20 (in network)  $57.37**  $56.00  50/50 (out of network) Difference: $1.37 *Representative of one of the largest insurance providers in KS **Copay not reimburse-able and doesn’t count toward deductible We’re excited to offer good value and affordable care in a simplified...
Eat Food

Eat Food

This is a talk given by one of my favorite writers when it comes to food, Michael Pollan. He started with the Omnivore’s Dilemma and then wrote Food Rules (a sort of instruction manual for eating). He is an American author, journalist, activist, and professor of journalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.  A 2006 New York Times book review describes him as a “liberal foodie intellectual.”   I frequently share his 3 rules of eating: Eat food* Mostly plants Not much of it *I remind people that real food generally doesn’t come out of a box out of a can out of a bag over a counter through a window And… if it have more than 5 ingredients you should really question whether its food. There are some exceptions to those rules (frozen fruit and veggies from a bag etc), but for the most part that will be all you need to know about how to eat. I found one particular fact that he points out interesting: poor women that cooked their own food were healthier than wealthy women that didn’t. We need to get back to food that’s cooked by us rather than food that’s cooked by corporations. Although I haven’t read his latest book, Cooked: A Natural History of  Transformation, I plan to very soon. Oh, and for those of you disturbed by the pesticide used on potatoes, I found a link to the chemical profile of...
Stress Check

Stress Check

Stress Check from Azumio  is pretty simple. It uses the camera on your phone to take your pulse and then analyzes the variability of your heart rate to calculate your level of stress. Research evidence increasingly links high heart rate variability to good health and a high level of fitness, while decreased HRV is linked to stress, fatigue and even burnout. Algorithms used to analyze HRV follow recommendations of European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE). A number of studies have shown that HRV is an important indicator of both physiological resiliency and behavioral flexibility, reflecting an individual’s capacity to adapt effectively to stress and environmental demands. It has become apparent that while a large degree of instability is detrimental to efficient physiological functioning, too little variation can also be pathological. An optimal level of variability within an organism’s key regulatory systems is critical to the inherent flexibility and adaptability that epitomize healthy function. This principle is aptly illustrated by a simple analogy: just as the shifting stance of a tennis player about to receive a serve may facilitate swift adaptation, in healthy individuals, the heart remains similarly responsive and resilient, primed and ready to react when needed. Most of us know when we are stressed. But we don’t always know how to relieve that stress. One way to use this application is to take a measurement and work on ways to decrease the effect of stress on your body. In future posts we’ll talk more about how you can use this biofeedback in conjunction with deep breathing exercises. There are more...